Why Crossfit May Not Actually Be THAT Bad

Real Arguments From Real Powerlifters

 

Repeat after me: Crossfit is really not that bad.  I mean, you’re bound to have one or two friends that absolutely must perform their W.O.D. every day.  Trust me, being a Crossfitter or a Powerlifter is nothing like being a Hillary supporter (or a Trump supporter).  I have been a staunch Powerlifter for most of my fitness career, bodybuilding before that, and maybe a short period where I threw in some “Crossfit-inspired” workout plans.

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My numerous jobs over the past 15 years since high school have put me in contact with Crossfit-type workouts; I worked as a deputy at a local jail about 10 years ago.  A couple co-workers were former military and they claimed Crossfit was the best.  I was fat and out of shape (hence the reason I got into the fitness industry) and a few years out of high school, so I thought “what the hell?” At the time, I guess since it was new, it wasn’t anything to write home to Mom about, so I started my journey in bodybuilding.  Then came working at a supplement store (known as Vitamin World) during college.  I worked here when most supplement companies began coming out with products for Crossfitters.  I became a bit more intrigued so I began doing SOME exercise plans based around Crossfit.  During my experience(s) with Crossfit, I had come to the realization that it was really not.

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Then came working at a supplement store (known as Vitamin World) during college.  I worked here when most supplement companies began coming out with products for Crossfitters.  I became a bit more intrigued so I began doing SOME exercise plans based around Crossfit.  During my experience(s) with Crossfit, I had come to the realization that it was really not that bad.

Let’s start with the most obvious argument: Crossfit workouts don’t have any variety.  Sorry, but have you seen some of the W.O.Ds?  They are widely varied with the base workouts being squats, deadlifts, overhead presses, snatches, rows, and dips.  “But they don’t do bench press.”  If you’ve ever wandered into a Crossfit gym, they literally do 5-10 burpees every few exercises.  That will undoubtedly lead to a massive number of push-ups; I think they’re good on the chest workouts.

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Continued below…

 

Most women think they’ll “bulk up”.  This is a valid argument that I’ve actually heard recently.  I just threw it in here so I can put a picture of a hot Crossfit chick.  You’re welcome.

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Another argument I’ve heard: Crossfitters don’t even lift heavy, they just do high-rep workouts.  You may be correct, to an extent.  There are programs designed to find out a one-rep max, two-rep max, etc.  Oh shit, that sounds way too familiar, like powerlifting.  I will throw in an occasional high-rep leg extension after my squat session to keep my legs pumped.  On to the next one…

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Safety.  Crossfitters can injure themselves easily.  But going to a conventional gym and having the wrong personal trainer can cause easy injuries too.  Just like in powerlifting, bodybuilding, or general weightlifting, if you don’t have the correct form you’re bound to injure yourself.  Don’t be stupid, get a gym bro to spot you.

Finally, the most widely mentioned argument among my fitness communities:  all Crossfitters do is talk about Crossfit.  Of course, if you just became a father I bet a million dollars that you will talk about nothing other than being a father.  It’s new and exciting for some people, plus the initial progress is very rewarding for most.  Let them talk about it. You don’t necessarily have to listen, just nod your head and smile.

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Like this?  Then you may also like:

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